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London Design Festival: A Retrospective

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London Design Festival has now come to and end, but there are still opportunities to visit creative art & design exhibitions and locations around the city. The festival itself was a widespread immersion of design showcases throughout the city of London, offering a looking into what the professionals and new talents of the design world were coming up with next.   The Mayor of London Boris Johnson had this to say about this years festival: ‘The London Design Festival is a magnificent convocation of designers from around the world, reinforcing our city’s status as one of the world’s greatest centres for creativity and innovation. It’s a terrific and wide-ranging showcase of a sector that generates around £15 billion a year for our economy and is critically important to our future prosperity.   The 11th annual festival was hosted with over 250 partners, and spread over 300 locations. The V&A (Victoria and Albert) Museum acted as the central hub for the festival once again this year, running a daily rotating schedule of activities, talks, workshops, and exhibitions in their Sackler Centre. One noteworthy attraction of the festival was the Coutts Bank headquarters on 440 Strand got involved with London Design festival by transforming the glazed façade into a map and list of all participating festival locations and destinations.

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The Southbank Centre also contributed to the festival with a scientific take on art & design. Some of their exhibited work was from the minds of university students on varying science courses, along with students from equally varying arts courses. Sometimes even paired together. Next stop was the Landmark Project of Tate Modern’s Endless Stair installation. The complex staircase was designed by Alex de Rijke and the Arup engineering team. The endless stair was a take on the optical illusion of a never-ending staircase that twisted and turned in a myriad of directions, with no clear sense of direction. The installation was used by children and adults alike, even the occasional jogger, allowing for passers-by to not only admire but also interact with the piece.

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Next stop was the Landmark Project of Tate Modern’s Endless Stair installation. The complex staircase was designed by Alex de Rijke and the Arup engineering team. The endless stair was a take on the optical illusion of a never-ending staircase that twisted and turned in a myriad of directions, with no clear sense of direction. The installation was used by children and adults alike, even the occasional jogger, allowing for passers-by to not only admire but also interact with the piece.

Going along with the special events and exhibitions around London, there were many participating shops in the design industry. This generally included design practices, or design focused retail shops that were around other design festival locations. They were easy to find my the London Design Festival banners prompt up outside of their establishments. It helped to get a clear sense that he festival was happening over the entire city in all sorts of locations. They were even offering handy guide books, leaflets, and maps to let yo know what else was going on around the city.   Ending the London Design Festival was the Design Junction, running from September 18-22 on new Oxford streets The Sorting Office. As well as being a place of designers from all over the world, and from different specialities to show off their own innovations, the Design Junction was also a place for up-and-coming designers to showcase themselves and get some recognition from industry professionals. There were two London universities took the opportunity to help to establish their most most talented graduates of the year.   The Camberwell Collective was an exhibitor from the UAL (University of the Arts London) featuring a range of 3D design projects from 8 selected students. The work included innovative furniture designs, kitchen appliances, clothing accessories, and even an ingenious make-shift electronic drum-kit. While CASS School of Design was another exhibition featuring the work from this year’s 40 best design graduates from furniture, jewellery, textiles, illustrations, interiors, and graphics. Some of the work on display included the artistic processes of interior architecture design and how the graduates approached design,space and layout.

You can contact the London Design Festival via their site, google+, twitter, or facebook page for the highlights of the festival and to keep up to date with what’s coming next.

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