Hyunsu Yim

Crashing, Channel 4 – TV review: It’s like Friends, but a whole lot edgier

Decrease Font Size Increase Font Size Text Size Print This Page

This comedy series which evolves around the lives and relationships of twenty-somethings living in a disused hospital in London will make you laugh, cry, and confused.

c1869e9a-3c6b-4ffc-a583-c3091f2c91d7_625x352

Channel 4’s six-part comedy series ‘Crashing’ ended its first season with the last episode which aired last Friday. At first glance, Crashing looks like any other flat-share comedy show which seems to be something British TV is never short of. However, set in an unusual living arrangement that is a disused hospital, – filmed in the Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel, according to EveningStandard – things are guaranteed to be a lot more interesting. As most Londoners face sky-high rental prices, with some of them going the extra mile to avoid them and even considering living on a boat, the show couldn’t have come at a better time.

 

Written by 30-year-old playwright Phoebe Waller-Bridge who also plays Lulu on the show, she entertainingly captures the drama and relationships between the main cast consisting of six multi-dimensional characters: Anthony, Kate, Lulu, Fred, Melody, and Sam. Tensions rise as the quick-witted Lulu moves in. Instead of coming clean about her feelings, Kate, who’s secretly jealous of the close friendship between Lulu and Anthony, plays cool – a regular occurrence in modern-day dating.  Colin – played by Adrian Scarborough – is a great addition to the housemates. As his relationship with Melody develops further, it gives viewers a glimpse into what could only be described as a disastrous, yet loveable relationship. Sexuality is another thing the show touches on through Sam who fancies his housemate Fred, but struggles to come to terms with his sexuality.

 

Things unfold in the last episode. Regardless of the criticism it received that it was trying too hard when the pilot episode aired, by the end of the series, all the characters feel a lot more relatable. I think the show improved each episode in terms of storyline and characters as it exposed row emotions of the housemates and candidly depicted their feelings towards each other. There’s no question that this fast-paced, banter-packed show will make you laugh, but there’s more to the show than comedy which makes the show more interesting and watchable: house-sharing in a hospital, a jealous girlfriend, friends with benefits, bisexuality, and an age-gap relationship.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *